Peaknit

Saturday, June 02, 2007

the internet rocks

I am just astonished at the valuable tools offered on the internet. Do most of you remember doing research with real encyclopedias or *eek* science journals? Microfiche? Good lord, sometimes aint technology grand?! Even "aint" is a word now!

First of all - I have found Bloglines to be indespensible. Sure, for some time I denied myself looking into it and surfed from blog to blog - on Bloglines you can "subscribe" to your favorite blogs and when there are updated...voila! Bloglines tells you so. So instead of surfing all over the net, one handy site can do this all for you. It's like having a paralegal do all of the research. You all know how much time can get away from you mindlessly wandering from here to there - time management at it's finest.

Then there is the new craze...have you heard? Ravelry! It's amazing. I think you have to wait around for invite these days but I was lucky enough to score one from Chicken Knits pretty early in the game. Boy, am I glad I did. This site is like a "clearing house for knitters". You can store a picture history of your stash, current and finished projects - and search easily for people who are working on the same project, working with the same yarn or...good grief, it's endless. It's like a great meeting place to network with other knitters. So many familiar faces there: Scout J, splityarn, hello yarn, etc. There are designers, links to advertisers. Too much for words, people - you need to get on over there.

Then along another path there is Paperbackswap.com. If you are an avid reader - you should check. this. out. I am kind of a book whore - I love to read and then I like to stick the book on my shelf - to admire my collection - I like to watch it grow. But then every once in awhile you get a lemon - a book you know will never get taken out of the shelf, one you wouldn't even lend to a friend because maybe you didn't like it. Well, guess what friends? Someone out there is waiting for this book. You can post books on a "virtual shelf" and for merely the cost of media mail shipping - which has gone up to $2.13 - someone can request your book, you send it off and earn yourself a credit. With each credit you can request things off of other members' virtual shelves. This week alone I have ordered The Memory Keeper's Daughter, Rosie by Anne LaMott and two by Jodi Picoult. The kicker here is - it's nearly free. You know a good book over at Borders, or even Amazon (which I frequent enough anyways) will run you $10 - this only costs you mailing. In addition, you have the pleasure of knowing someone else is enjoying a book that may have otherwise collected dust on your shelf while waiting for something new in the mailbox. I received the Tenth Circle today - in pristine condition - what a treat. Once I get through Prodigal Summer by Barbara Kingsolver - I will have a fresh stack waiting for me. If you cannot bear to part with some of your own collection to gain "points" you can buy credits - three for $10.35 - still way cheaper than going to the store for a new copy. You gotta love this kind of recycling.

Obviously, the library is a great choice, but I did preface with I am a book ho...

I just finished...
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I was drawn to this book because Elizabeth Gilbert, who wrote my #1 favorite book Eat, Pray, Love, had a quote on the cover - so a leap of faith. It's a quick read and the narrator is very likable. This sweet book runs two concurrent threads...the narrator's spanking new, modern day marriage, intertwined with the story of her grandmother's marriage in old Ireland. Each chapter is kicked off with one of grandma's recipes - honey cake may just be a keeper. The book lends a great perspective in some respect to the true life yet somehow unexpected unpleasantries of marriage. The narrator had delusions of granduer - oh, certainly you married women can relate as I did. You get to watch both main characters struggle through their relationships and understand what love is probably really about. It was enlightening to see the rose colored glasses come off - I personally think the comfort and security that my own marriage has grown into far outweighs the wandering and elusiveness (sprinkled with good stuff) the first years came with. I think the true reward lies beyond the exciting beginning. I truly believe slow and steady wins the race, - and marriage is no exception. I think I saw both main characters ultimately prescribe to this reality - life is good.

4 Comments:

Blogger Tina said...

(laughing) I was just thinking about the joys of the internet lately (you can even find medieval manuscripts on there!). I can't even remember how we used to communicate and look things up before...morse code? signal fires? It's all been wiped clean, probably by someone using wikipedia.

12:56 PM  
Anonymous sandra said...

Thanks, thnaks, thanks,... and one more thanks for pointing out BLOGLINES! I was sooo stupid not knowing about that! Well, must buy myself a bwornbag and cover my head!

2:23 AM  
Blogger MollyBeees said...

I am finally halfway through Eat Pray Love. What a profound book! I just love it! Thanks for the recommendation!

3:44 PM  
Blogger Knitting Bandit said...

I thought we were equals. I, too, love Bloglines. Whew! What a time saver. Now, I don't have to feel as guilty about my online time. I, too, think Paperback Swap is great. It's fun to send and receive books from all over the country. And the money saved$$!!! But we ARE UNEQUAL in Ravelry. I'm still waiting...so sad.

11:17 AM  

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